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Snowdon (1085m)


Snowdon in cloud

Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa) is the highest mountain in Wales and, at an altitude of 1,085 metres (3,560 ft) above sea level, and the highest point in the British Isles outside Scotland. It is located in Snowdonia National Park in North Wales and has is commonly been described as 'the busiest mountain in Britain'. It is designated as a national nature reserve for its rare flora and fauna. Snowdon boasts some of the best views in Britain and the summit can be reached by a number of well-known paths. The summit can also be reached on the Snowdon Mountain Railway, a rack and pinion railway opened in 1896 which carries passengers the 4.7 miles (7.6 km) from Llanberis to the summit station.

Despite the busy nature of Snowdon, all paths and routes up have their risks and dangers. These risks are increased during poor conditions (such as wet weather or poor visibility). In winter, straightforward paths can be come treacherous. If you are considering a day on Snowdon, then preparation is the key.

'Enjoy the Mountains in Safety'


 
VISIT THE SNOWDON PATHS PAGES
 
Llanberis Mountain Rescue Navigation Training

Llanberis Path

Llanberis Path is the longest and most gradual of the six main paths to the summit of Snowdon. It offers fantastic views of Cwm Brwynog, Llanberis and over the Menai straights towards Anglesey. This is the most popular path amongst leisurely walkers as it is thought to be the easiest to walk in mild weather. But, in winter, the highest slopes of the path can become very dangerous.

Rhyd Ddu Path

This path up Snowdon is the quietest of the six main routes to the summit, and the one that offers the most striking mountain scenery, especially towards Moel Hebog and the hills of Nantlle.

Snowdon Ranger

The path climbs gradually up to, and around the slopes of Moel Cynghorion to Bwlch Cwm Brwynog. It then climbs steeply over the shoulder above Clogwyn Du’r Arddu before merging with the Llanberis path, and then the Pyg and Miners’ tracks at Bwlch Glas, and then on to the summit.

PyG Track

This is the most rugged and challenging of the six paths up Snowdon, which leads along the foothills of Crib Goch. The route up Crib Goch and along the ridge is extremely dangerous and should not be attempted by novice walkers.

Miners Path

The path starts off wide and even, climbing gradually passed Llyn Teyrn to Llyn Llydaw, where the ruins of the old copper mine can be seen. From here, the path climbs steeply to Llyn Glaslyn, where it becomes a hard climb over scree towards the intersection of the Miners’ and the Pyg Tracks. The path then zigzags up to Bwlch Glas, and then on to the summit.

Watkin Path

This is thought to be one of the most hard going paths up Snowdon, as it starts only a little above sea level. The path starts off wide and quite even, but becomes rocky towards the second half, and then crosses loose scree before leading up to the summit.

Charity Event on Snowdon? Visit here



The Llanberis Mountain Rescue Team, is a registered charity. Address : The Treasurer, 34, Glanffynnon, Llanrug, Gwynedd, LL55 4PR
(Charity registration no. 513913).
Telephone : 07787471389
Email : info@llanberismountainrescue.co.uk

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Sunday :  sunny intervals

Sun 7°C

Monday :  white cloud

Mon 7°C

Tuesday :  heavy rain

Tue 8°C


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